In terms of plumbing, jobs don’t get much bigger than repiping a home. The good news is that repiping is usually only needed when a home is very old, and once the job is complete, it can last up to a century. The bad news is that it isn’t cheap, even when using an affordable service.

In general, pipes that need to be replaced are made from materials that are no longer commonly used. Older homes often have galvanized steel pipes, and some even have iron pipes. Both of these materials are quite durable, but over decades, corrosion will occur. If you have galvanized steel or iron pipes, it is a good idea to consider repiping.

But What Should You Replace Them With?

There are quite a few options on the market, but only your plumber will be able to determine which is the correct option for you. In truth, whole-house repiping jobs rarely use just one material. Instead, they use a combination of materials so they are able to customize the pipes based on their function and environment. Below are some common materials used in modern plumbing systems.

Copper

Lighter than steel and more flexible, this is the go-to material for plumbers. While it is very durable under pressure, the primary reason it is favored is that it resists corrosion.

CPVC

While copper is the preferred material, PVC pipes are also very common. Out of the various types of plastic pipes, CPVC is the most prevalent as it is stronger than basic PVC pipes. CPVC is often used in drain lines and hot water lines since it can withstand high temperature.

PEX

PEX is an alternative to CPVC and is fairly new to the market. They are more expensive than CPVC, but they also last longer while offering flexibility that allows them to be installed in tight spaces. They also resist heat loss, making them ideal for hot water lines.

Repiping

Chances are your plumber will offer you a choice between these materials when deciding the primary type of pipe to be used. If you are going for the most cost effective, CPVC would be the right choice. If you are wanting the longest life for your pipes, PEX is the way to go. However, many homeowners still prefer copper due its high quality and safety, despite it not being the most cost effective or the longest lasting. In other words, your decision will be a personal one.

Once you settle on a material, the plumber should start the repiping process soon. Some plumbers will need to tear out floors and walls to complete this job. However, there are plumbers who have developed minimally invasive techniques that allow them to remove and install pipes without extensive renovations. These services can complete residential repiping jobs in a day or less.

When You Need Repiping, Turn to Biard & Crockett

Our professional team can offer you minimally invasive repiping that ensures your life is not disrupted while we do our work. To find out the cost and which materials are best for you home, contact us today.